Tag Archives: Family & Marriage

Saturday Video Roundup: dead man partying

I’m heading out for a friend’s all-day bachelor party event here in a few minutes. Back when I was DJing I did a lot of wedding receptions, and I always made sure to play three songs. Somehow, I never got punched once. So in honor of my buddy’s upcoming nuptials, here’s a matrimonial threefer.

First, I knew the bride when she used to rock and roll.

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Great moments in the history of traditional family values: Rush Limbaugh weds, Elton John sings for his supper

So, Rush Limbaugh just got married. Congrats, Rush – we wish you well.

We wanted to note this momentous occasion because, as you know, Rush is a big proponent of family values, and few things say family like walking down the aisle and publicly expressing your lifelong commitment to the person of the opposite gender that you love.

Especially when you’re so committed to traditional values that you do it four times. Wow.

Sir Elton John, whose raging queerness makes him incapable of family values, was allegedly paid $1M to play the reception. Read more

Jon & Kate: a sign of the times to come

If you’ve been off-planet for the last few months you may have missed the news: Jon & Kate have split, and in the process migrated from the relative banality of the TV listings over to the hyper-banality of the tabloids. I’m still not sure what the future holds for the popular “reality” show, but whatever it is, Gosselin family 2.0 equals Jon minus Kate.

It occurs to me that these events represent something significant in our culture. Since about 1980 or so we’ve been in one of our periodic “childrens is the most preciousest things in the whole wide world” phases. (For more on the generational cycles that produce this dynamic, see Generations, 13th Gen and Millennials Rising by William Howe and Neil Strauss, two men whose work I have referenced a number of times in the past.) In the previous generation (Gen X), children were an afterthought for most parents, who had been socialized in far more self-centric times. Read more